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Two-Stroke Engines
    Because of their greater power/weight ratio two stroke engines are used in many small
applications. This page includes some theory of op., tuning methods, etc.....



    Here's an animated gif showing the induction/exhaust strokes of a two cycle engine. It also shows how an expansion pipe works. (credit for gif goes to http://www.angelfire.com/hi3/smokeonthewater/ )
 

My Two-Strokes:

Motorcycle:

    In the summer of 2001, I happened to be driving through the town of Sandown, NH, when I noticed an older motorcycle in someone's yard for sale. Being the collector I am, I had to take a look a look at it. What I had found was a pristine 1972 Yamaha R5-C with less then 3000 original miles! Unfortunately, no one was home, but after visiting later in the day, I managed to get ahold of the seller, and 50$ poorer, I became the proud owner of the beast. After spending some time procuring a new set of points (thank god for ebay) and putting a battery in it, I convinced it to run, as it has ever since. Hopefully this summer I will get some pics of it up.
 

Dirtbike:

    A several years ago, my brother managed to pick up an 81' Yamaha IT 175 from a guy he knew for $15, and after losing interest in it, gave it to me. After putting in a new piston/rings, it ran amazingly well, and so became my offroad machine of choice. Because of the fact that the IT was one of the fastest bikes in its class, it has many of the innovations found on newer bikes ( aluminum monoshock swingarm, expansion pipe, general frame specs of newer bikes, etc). It also has the benfit of being far cheaper to own. Not to metion really fast. Of course, with its enduro gearing, it doesn't do the best on a MX course, but for old logging roads and  gravel pits, the only bike that can keep up with me is a 250 or larger. Not bad for less than 100 bucks.   
 
 
 
 

More to come later.......
 



 
 

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